Why Landscaping Matters

I just read a blog post by Seth Godin, entitled ‘The Reason.’ In it, he lists the reason for a front yard is to demonstrate to friends and neighbors “how much time you have to waste.”

As I have written my thoughts and analyzed them, at first I disagreed with Seth. Who is he to say that landscaping and gardening is a waste of time. Then the thought occurred to me. “Oh, he’s talking about lawn when he means front yard.”

He’s not talking trash about trees and plants. He’s talking about high maintenance landscaping like beautiful golf course green lawns. The kind that need the chemical trucks and door knocking salespeople to maintain them.

It’s clear the trend in new construction in Nashville is pushing community over privacy. Less lawn and outdoor space or the outdoor space isn’t landscaped like a deck or outdoor kitchen.

That’s fine, as long as people are still going outside.

That’s why I was so upset at first when I read Seth’s blog post. Being outside whether you’re doing yard work or just relaxing with friends and family is important. Whether we can quantify it with data or not.

I couldn’t disagree more. The reason you have a front yard is to connect nature with our sterile lives. Inside our dry air, sanitized lives, we control everything.

Outside, the birds chirp and the bugs pollinate the flowers. It’s real life, man. Too many people think this is luxury. Like we have a choice whether we just want sterile, germ free existence.

With the millennial generation beginning to buy homes, it’s clear the trend is that they value community over privacy. They (we) don’t want to mow the grass, prune the shrubs, etc. I get that, it can be hard work.

But back to Godin’s point that it’s just wasting time. It’s not, you’re expressing yourself, you’re creating outdoor space that benefits other small organisms and cleaning the water and air. What’s wrong with that?

Who can’t get behind cleaner air and water? So maybe Seth Godin has a problem with people mowing their yards. Maybe he secretly doesn’t want to see grass yards. I can agree, there is a time commitment.

So if you’re looking to reduce your lawn footprint, I can help. Trees take up a lot of space, followed by shrubs, and annuals and perennials.

That’s one thing we can agree on, Seth and I, we can do with less lawn.

2015 Images

 

2015-12-19 15.57.19

New Sod, Trees, Shrubs, Grasses, and Seasonal Color invite you to your new Nashville home.

 

Soft touch holly border along the sidewalk.

Soft touch holly border along the sidewalk in this before and after Nashville home.

 

Small Colorguard Yucca planted next to variegated liriope.

Small Colorguard Yucca planted next to variegated liriope and a river birch in Murfreesboro.

 

Kale and lettuce started from seed in early February. Transplanted to the raised bed in late March.

 

Lettuce removed, wasn't heat tolerant.

Edible landscaping with a cedar raised bed and pea gravel mulch.

 

River rock mulch with abelias and hydrangeas in Smyrna.

 

Herb kitchen garden with native perennials.

Herb kitchen garden with native perennials in this shady Nashville backyard.

 

Arborvitae removed, replaced with glossy abelia and hydrangea border.

Arborvitae removed, replaced with glossy abelia and hydrangea border.

 

PicMonkey Collage

Boxwood replaced with azaleas.

 

New sod and shrubs for this home near Opryland.

New sod and shrubs for this home near Opryland.

 

Variegated liriope (monkey grass) border with english laurels and Limelight hydrangeas.

Variegated liriope (monkey grass) border with english laurels and Limelight hydrangeas.

 

Korean boxwood and blue Endless Summer hydrangea create a dramatic before and after.

Korean boxwood and blue Endless Summer hydrangea create a dramatic before and after.

 

My first container garden at a the Icon in the Gulch. Emerald Green Arborvitae with white impatiens and creeping jenny perennial.

My first container garden at ┬áthe Icon in the Gulch, Nashville! Emerald Green Arborvitae with white impatiens and creeping jenny perennial. Don’t let the pots freeze in the Winter…

 

A weigelia was removed, the Centennial Spirit crapemyrtle was pruned, and a korean boxwood border added. A soaker hose is buried under the mulch for irrigation during the August heat.

East Nashville bungalow…A weigelia was removed, the Centennial Spirit crapemyrtle was pruned, and a korean boxwood border added. A soaker hose is buried under the mulch for irrigation during the August heat.

 

Shady perennial garden started from the weeds!

Shady perennial garden started from the weeds!

 

Abelias and azaleas bring evergreen interest to a shady front yard.

Abelias and azaleas bring evergreen interest to a shady front yard.

 

Perennials and flowering shrubs spruce up this nice home.

Perennials and flowering shrubs spruce up this nice home.

 

This shady area on the north side of the home is perfect for ferns and blue Endless Summer hydrangeas.

This shady area on the north side of the home is perfect for ferns and blue Endless Summer hydrangeas.

Edible Landscaping with Raised Beds 2015

I started these curly leaf lettuce, bibb lettuce, and kale seeds in early February. I’m planning to upgrade my fluorescent grow light to LED so look for bigger projects in the future! Needless to say, Merry is very happy with the fresh crop of lettuce and kale.

It has taken four months of TLC, and I'm addicted to seed starting!

It has taken four months of TLC, and I’m addicted to seed starting!